Proteas turn to pink in must-win clash

JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA - FEBRUARY 09: Chris Morris of the Proteas during the South African national mens cricket team training session and press conference at Bidvest Wanderers Stadium on February 09, 2018 in Johannesburg, South Africa. (Photo by Lee Warren/Gallo Images)

JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA - FEBRUARY 09: Chris Morris of the Proteas during the South African national mens cricket team training session and press conference at Bidvest Wanderers Stadium on February 09, 2018 in Johannesburg, South Africa. (Photo by Lee Warren/Gallo Images)

The Standard Bank Proteas will be hoping for some Pink Day inspiration in the fourth Momentum One-Day International (ODI) against India at the Bidvest Wanderers Stadium on Saturday. The Proteas have yet to lose an ODI in pink – they have won seven out of seven – which should serve as extra inspiration with the series on the line.

The Pink ODI has become a standout feature on the cricketing calendar, with the players, stakeholders and fans playing their part in raising funds towards fighting breast cancer. This year, the Breast Care Clinic at the Charlotte Maxeke Academic Hospital in Johannesburg is the new beneficiary, with all funds raised on the day going towards the facility.

Proteas all-rounder, Chris Morris, says the day is special for all the players involved, and has given them extra motivation to preserve their unbeaten record.

“ It is a special day for South Africa,” Morris said of the occasion. “ We play for a special cause and it is always a great event playing in front of a pink and packed Wanderers. It has been a great tradition playing in pink, it is for a good cause and we are lucky as cricketers to do what we do and be healthy. There are a lot of people in our country suffering with cancer, particularly breast cancer, this day has an emotional side to it and we are glad we can do our bit.

“ There is natural pressure but our unbeaten run in pink will obviously add more pressure to it,” he said. “ It is do or die, if we lose one more that is the series gone. We will be fighting for every ball and every single run out there. There is pressure but what is cricket without pressure, it would be boring.

AB de Villiers has recovered from a finger injury and returns to inject experience and temperament to the middle order. Morris says De Villiers’ experience on and off the field will be invaluable ahead of the match, along with sharing important tips on how to counter India’s spin threat.

“ AB is AB, apart from what he brings on the field it’s what he also brings off it,” Morris said. “ He brings that calmness and experience. To have a world-class player come back into the side is a special occasion. I enjoy sharing the field with AB, he is one of the best players in the world and one of the best to play for South Africa. For the team he brings so much more than just runs, he brings the AB de Villiers factor.”

India lead the six-match series 3-0.

Tickets for the match have been sold out. The match will start at 13h00 local time.



Notes

Video and audio featuring Chris Morris can be located on the ftp site below.

www.csamedia

Official website, hashtag and handles

www.PinkDay.co.za

#PinkDay #PinkODI #PitchUpInPink

CSA: @OfficialCSA
Bidvest: @Bidvest
Momentum: @Momentum_za

About the Breast Care Clinic at the Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital

The Breast Care Clinic at the Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, run by Doctor Sarah Nietz and her team of dedicated specialist nurses, provide access to quality breast care, regardless of geographical location and socioeconomic status. The unit sees up to 350 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer every year and provide a service to seven district hospitals. Patients from other provinces and all over Africa are also accommodated.

Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital also trains medical students, interns, medical officers, registrars and junior consultants in breast care making it a centre of excellence in this field. There is also a “Breast course 4 Nurses” programme to empower nurses in breast care

On an annual basis this hospital treats more than 200,000 patients. The breast care clinic, newly diagnoses 350 breast care cases annually from Gauteng, Mpumalanga, Limpopo and even further afield. The sad reality is that due to a lack of education around the disease, patients often arrive at the hospital at a time when a fairly treatable disease, if detected early, has progressed beyond the point of treatment. The aim is to invest in a tangible facility and contribute to the service they give as well as the research and education they do to enable more successful treatment of breast cancer through earlier diagnosis.